The Resource Learning Through Visual Displays

Learning Through Visual Displays

Label
Learning Through Visual Displays
Title
Learning Through Visual Displays
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Schraw, Gregory
LC call number
LB1067.5 -- .L43 2013eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • McCrudden, Matthew T
  • Robinson, Daniel
  • ProQuest (Firm)
Series statement
Current Perspectives on Cognition, Learning and Instruction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Cognition
  • Learning, Psychology of
  • Visual learning
Label
Learning Through Visual Displays
Link
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/multco/detail.action?docID=3315907
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Intro -- Learning Through Visual Displays -- A Volume in Current Perspectives on Cognition, Learning, and Instruction -- Series Editors: Gregory Schraw, University of Nevada -- Matthew T. McCrudden, Victoria University of Wellington -- Daniel Robinson, Colorado State University -- CONTENTS -- Section I: Introduction -- 1. Visual Displays and Learning: Theoretical and Practical Considerations -- Section II: Theoretical Frameworks -- 2. Some Instructional Consequences of Logical Relations Between Multiple Sources of Information -- 3. Fostering Learning With Visual Displays -- 4. Knowledge and Working Memory Effects on Learning From Visual Displays -- 5. Toward a Typology of Instructional Visual Displays -- Section III: Using Visual Displays to Enhance Learning -- 6. Static and Dynamic Visual Representations: Individual Differences in Processing -- 7. Static Visual Displays for Deeper Understanding: How to Help Learners Make Use of Them -- 8. Strategies for Note Taking on Computer-Based Graphic Organizers -- 9. Strategy Training With Causal Diagrams to Improve Text Learning -- 10. Cognitive Model of Drawing Construction: Learning Through the Construction of Drawings -- 11. Graphic Organizers as Aids for Students With Learning Disabilities -- 12. Concept Maps for Learning: Theory, Research, and Design -- 13. Argument Diagrams and Learning: Cognitive and Educational Perspectives -- Section iv: Using Visual Displays to Improve Resaerch -- 14. A Typology of Visual Displays in Qualitative Analyses -- 15. Using Visual Displays to Enhance Understanding of Quantitative Research -- 16. Using Visual Displays to Inform Assessment Design and Development -- Current Perspectives on Cognition, Learning, and Instruction -- Learning Through Visual Displays -- edited by -- Gregory Schraw -- University of Nevada -- Matthew T. McCrudden
  • Victoria University of Wellington -- and -- Daniel Robinson -- Colorado State University -- Information Age Publishing, Inc. -- Charlotte, North Carolina www.infoagepub.com -- Section I -- Introduction -- CHAPTER 1 -- Visual Displays and Learning -- Theoretical and Practical Considerations -- Gregory Schraw, Matthew T. McCrudden, and Daniel H. Robinson -- Abstract -- Goals -- Summary of Chapters -- Section I -- Section II -- Section IV -- Five Information Processing Functions -- Recommendations for Future Research -- References -- CHAPTER 2 -- Some Instructional Consequences of Logical Relations Between Multiple Sources of Information -- Renae Low, Putai Jin, and John Sweller -- Abstract -- Introduction -- Cognitive Load Theory -- 1. The information store principle states that long-term memory contains a very large store of information governing most human cognitive activity. The information store holds schemata, the building blocks of knowledge, discussed above. Schemata can ... -- 2. The borrowing and reorganizing principle states that the bulk of information in long-term memory is obtained by borrowing information from other individuals by imitating them (Bandura, 1986), listening to what they say or reading what they write. ... -- 3. The randomness as genesis principle states that although most of the information in long-term memory is borrowed from others, creativity occurs when a learner randomly generates a problem- solving move and tests its effectiveness. -- 4. The narrow limits of change principle states that large-scale, dramatic, random changes are likely to cause traumatic effects on the functionality of long-term memory and thus the limited capacity of working memory ensures small, incremental chang..
  • 5. The environmental organizing and linking principle states that whereas the amount of information from sensory memory that can be processed by working memory is limited, the amount of information from long-term memory organized as schemata that can... -- Some Logical Relations Between Multiple Sources of Information -- The Split-Attention Effect -- The Redundancy Effect -- The Modality Effect -- The Transient Information Effect -- Conclusions -- References -- Figure 2. 1. A conventional, split-attention geometry example. -- Figure 2. 2. A conventional, redundant biology example. -- Figure 2. 3. A physically integrated geometry example. -- section ii -- Theoretical Frameworks -- CHAPTER 3 -- Fostering Learning With Visual Displays -- Richard E. Mayer -- Abstract -- Introduction to Visual Displays in Education -- The Case for Visual Displays in Education -- How People Learn with Visual Displays -- How Instructional Design Principles Can Improve Learning with Visual Displays -- Future Directions for Research on Visual Displays that Support Student Learning -- Acknowledgments -- Note -- References -- Figure 3. 1. What's wrong with this visual display about the water cycle? -- Figure 3. 2. Applying the coherence principle to a visual display about the water cycle -- Figure 3. 3. Applying the spatial contiguity principle to a visual display about the water cycle -- Figure 3. 4. Applying the signaling principle to a visual display about the water cycle -- Figure 3. 5. Applying the pretraining principle to a visual display about the water cycle. -- Figure 3. 9. An annotated visual display about how bicycle tire pumps work. -- Figure 3. 6. Applying the segmenting principle to a visual display about the water cycle. -- Figure 3. 7. Applying the modality principle to a visual display about the water cycle
  • Figure 3. 8. Applying the personalization principle to a visual display about the water cycle. -- Figure 3. 10. A cognitive theory of learning from words and visuals. -- Table 3.1. Three Demands on Cognitive Resources During Learning -- Table 3.3. Three Principles for Managing Essential Processing -- Table 3.2. Three Principles for Reducing Extraneous Processing -- Table 3.3. Three Principles for Fostering Generative Processing -- CHAPTER 4 -- Knowledge and Working Memory Effects on Learning From Visual Displays -- Slava Kalyuga -- Abstract -- Cognitive Architecture and Human Learning -- Expertise Reversal Effect -- Reducing Cognitive Load in Visual Displays -- Visual Displays With Onscreen or Narrated Text -- Pictorial Representations in Language Instruction -- Reducing Visual Cognitive Load in Interactive Dynamic Visualizations -- Simulations -- Animations -- Web-Based Representations -- Spreadsheets -- Tailoring Visual Displays to Levels of Learner Expertise -- Conclusion -- References -- Figure 4. 1. Single-modality format presented to novice learners. -- Figure 4. 2. Single-modality format presented to more experienced learners. -- Figure 4. 3. Visual display with iconic information representations in a gas laws simulation. -- CHAPTER 5 -- Toward a Typology of Instructional Visual Displays -- Gregory Schraw and Eugene Paik -- Abstract -- Introduction -- Eight Types of Instructional Visual Displays -- Signals -- Notes and Tabular Comparisons -- 1. Definition of note-taking -- 2. Encoding and retrieval functions -- 3. Summary of recent reviews -- (a) Joint effect of encoding and retrieval study on learning -- (b) Effect of instructor's notes -- Networks -- Sequences -- Hierarchies -- Distributions and Trend Graphs -- Maps and Spatial Proximity Diagrams -- Animations -- Summary -- Six Issues for Future Theory and Research -- Conclusions
  • References -- Figure 5. 1. Eight types of IVDs (and within-category examples). -- Figure 5. 2. A network diagram of the three branches of the United States federal government -- Table 5.1. A Summary of the Definition, Purpose and Examples of Different Types of IVDs -- Figure 5. 3 Partial classification of knowledge in long-term memory. -- section iii -- Using Visual Displays to Enhance Learning -- CHAPTER 6 -- Static and Dynamic Visual Representations -- Individual Differences in Processing -- Tim N. Höffler, Annett Schmeck, and Maria Opfermann -- Abstract -- Introduction -- WHY LEARNING (OFTEN) WORKS BETTER WHEN VISUAL REPRESENTATIONS ARE ADDED to TEXT -- TYPES of VISUAL REPRESENTATIONS THAT CAN BE USED to SUPPORT MEANINGFUL LEARNING -- Different Ways to Distinguish Instructional Visual Representations -- Static and Dynamic Visual Representations -- What Can Be Understood as Static or Dynamic? -- Are Animations Always Better? -- Instructional Design of Animations: Where is the Impact? -- Individual Differences: Who Benefits From What? -- The Role of Cognitive Style for Learning With Animations -- The Role of Spatial Ability for Learning With Animations -- Conclusions: Can We Give Recommendations for the Design of Visual Representations? -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Figure 6. 3. A series of consecutive static pictures depicting the correct sequence of motions for high jumping. In this case, all 14 pictures have been merged into one picture. -- Figure 6. 1. A static picture explaining the Pythagorean theorem. -- Figure 6. 2. Exemplary states of the mitosis process. -- Figure 6. 4. Mirror neurons are activated when observing motions made by others. Similar brain areas are activated when actions are observed or actually executed. -- Figure 6. 5. Highly realistic and schematic pictures illustrating high jumping
  • Figure 6. 6. Series of simultaneously shown static pictures depicting motions of fish used in the study of Imhof et al. (2011)
Control code
EBC3315907
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (460 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781623962357
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC3315907
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL3315907
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10747031
  • (OCoLC)923178391
Label
Learning Through Visual Displays
Link
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/multco/detail.action?docID=3315907
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Intro -- Learning Through Visual Displays -- A Volume in Current Perspectives on Cognition, Learning, and Instruction -- Series Editors: Gregory Schraw, University of Nevada -- Matthew T. McCrudden, Victoria University of Wellington -- Daniel Robinson, Colorado State University -- CONTENTS -- Section I: Introduction -- 1. Visual Displays and Learning: Theoretical and Practical Considerations -- Section II: Theoretical Frameworks -- 2. Some Instructional Consequences of Logical Relations Between Multiple Sources of Information -- 3. Fostering Learning With Visual Displays -- 4. Knowledge and Working Memory Effects on Learning From Visual Displays -- 5. Toward a Typology of Instructional Visual Displays -- Section III: Using Visual Displays to Enhance Learning -- 6. Static and Dynamic Visual Representations: Individual Differences in Processing -- 7. Static Visual Displays for Deeper Understanding: How to Help Learners Make Use of Them -- 8. Strategies for Note Taking on Computer-Based Graphic Organizers -- 9. Strategy Training With Causal Diagrams to Improve Text Learning -- 10. Cognitive Model of Drawing Construction: Learning Through the Construction of Drawings -- 11. Graphic Organizers as Aids for Students With Learning Disabilities -- 12. Concept Maps for Learning: Theory, Research, and Design -- 13. Argument Diagrams and Learning: Cognitive and Educational Perspectives -- Section iv: Using Visual Displays to Improve Resaerch -- 14. A Typology of Visual Displays in Qualitative Analyses -- 15. Using Visual Displays to Enhance Understanding of Quantitative Research -- 16. Using Visual Displays to Inform Assessment Design and Development -- Current Perspectives on Cognition, Learning, and Instruction -- Learning Through Visual Displays -- edited by -- Gregory Schraw -- University of Nevada -- Matthew T. McCrudden
  • Victoria University of Wellington -- and -- Daniel Robinson -- Colorado State University -- Information Age Publishing, Inc. -- Charlotte, North Carolina www.infoagepub.com -- Section I -- Introduction -- CHAPTER 1 -- Visual Displays and Learning -- Theoretical and Practical Considerations -- Gregory Schraw, Matthew T. McCrudden, and Daniel H. Robinson -- Abstract -- Goals -- Summary of Chapters -- Section I -- Section II -- Section IV -- Five Information Processing Functions -- Recommendations for Future Research -- References -- CHAPTER 2 -- Some Instructional Consequences of Logical Relations Between Multiple Sources of Information -- Renae Low, Putai Jin, and John Sweller -- Abstract -- Introduction -- Cognitive Load Theory -- 1. The information store principle states that long-term memory contains a very large store of information governing most human cognitive activity. The information store holds schemata, the building blocks of knowledge, discussed above. Schemata can ... -- 2. The borrowing and reorganizing principle states that the bulk of information in long-term memory is obtained by borrowing information from other individuals by imitating them (Bandura, 1986), listening to what they say or reading what they write. ... -- 3. The randomness as genesis principle states that although most of the information in long-term memory is borrowed from others, creativity occurs when a learner randomly generates a problem- solving move and tests its effectiveness. -- 4. The narrow limits of change principle states that large-scale, dramatic, random changes are likely to cause traumatic effects on the functionality of long-term memory and thus the limited capacity of working memory ensures small, incremental chang..
  • 5. The environmental organizing and linking principle states that whereas the amount of information from sensory memory that can be processed by working memory is limited, the amount of information from long-term memory organized as schemata that can... -- Some Logical Relations Between Multiple Sources of Information -- The Split-Attention Effect -- The Redundancy Effect -- The Modality Effect -- The Transient Information Effect -- Conclusions -- References -- Figure 2. 1. A conventional, split-attention geometry example. -- Figure 2. 2. A conventional, redundant biology example. -- Figure 2. 3. A physically integrated geometry example. -- section ii -- Theoretical Frameworks -- CHAPTER 3 -- Fostering Learning With Visual Displays -- Richard E. Mayer -- Abstract -- Introduction to Visual Displays in Education -- The Case for Visual Displays in Education -- How People Learn with Visual Displays -- How Instructional Design Principles Can Improve Learning with Visual Displays -- Future Directions for Research on Visual Displays that Support Student Learning -- Acknowledgments -- Note -- References -- Figure 3. 1. What's wrong with this visual display about the water cycle? -- Figure 3. 2. Applying the coherence principle to a visual display about the water cycle -- Figure 3. 3. Applying the spatial contiguity principle to a visual display about the water cycle -- Figure 3. 4. Applying the signaling principle to a visual display about the water cycle -- Figure 3. 5. Applying the pretraining principle to a visual display about the water cycle. -- Figure 3. 9. An annotated visual display about how bicycle tire pumps work. -- Figure 3. 6. Applying the segmenting principle to a visual display about the water cycle. -- Figure 3. 7. Applying the modality principle to a visual display about the water cycle
  • Figure 3. 8. Applying the personalization principle to a visual display about the water cycle. -- Figure 3. 10. A cognitive theory of learning from words and visuals. -- Table 3.1. Three Demands on Cognitive Resources During Learning -- Table 3.3. Three Principles for Managing Essential Processing -- Table 3.2. Three Principles for Reducing Extraneous Processing -- Table 3.3. Three Principles for Fostering Generative Processing -- CHAPTER 4 -- Knowledge and Working Memory Effects on Learning From Visual Displays -- Slava Kalyuga -- Abstract -- Cognitive Architecture and Human Learning -- Expertise Reversal Effect -- Reducing Cognitive Load in Visual Displays -- Visual Displays With Onscreen or Narrated Text -- Pictorial Representations in Language Instruction -- Reducing Visual Cognitive Load in Interactive Dynamic Visualizations -- Simulations -- Animations -- Web-Based Representations -- Spreadsheets -- Tailoring Visual Displays to Levels of Learner Expertise -- Conclusion -- References -- Figure 4. 1. Single-modality format presented to novice learners. -- Figure 4. 2. Single-modality format presented to more experienced learners. -- Figure 4. 3. Visual display with iconic information representations in a gas laws simulation. -- CHAPTER 5 -- Toward a Typology of Instructional Visual Displays -- Gregory Schraw and Eugene Paik -- Abstract -- Introduction -- Eight Types of Instructional Visual Displays -- Signals -- Notes and Tabular Comparisons -- 1. Definition of note-taking -- 2. Encoding and retrieval functions -- 3. Summary of recent reviews -- (a) Joint effect of encoding and retrieval study on learning -- (b) Effect of instructor's notes -- Networks -- Sequences -- Hierarchies -- Distributions and Trend Graphs -- Maps and Spatial Proximity Diagrams -- Animations -- Summary -- Six Issues for Future Theory and Research -- Conclusions
  • References -- Figure 5. 1. Eight types of IVDs (and within-category examples). -- Figure 5. 2. A network diagram of the three branches of the United States federal government -- Table 5.1. A Summary of the Definition, Purpose and Examples of Different Types of IVDs -- Figure 5. 3 Partial classification of knowledge in long-term memory. -- section iii -- Using Visual Displays to Enhance Learning -- CHAPTER 6 -- Static and Dynamic Visual Representations -- Individual Differences in Processing -- Tim N. Höffler, Annett Schmeck, and Maria Opfermann -- Abstract -- Introduction -- WHY LEARNING (OFTEN) WORKS BETTER WHEN VISUAL REPRESENTATIONS ARE ADDED to TEXT -- TYPES of VISUAL REPRESENTATIONS THAT CAN BE USED to SUPPORT MEANINGFUL LEARNING -- Different Ways to Distinguish Instructional Visual Representations -- Static and Dynamic Visual Representations -- What Can Be Understood as Static or Dynamic? -- Are Animations Always Better? -- Instructional Design of Animations: Where is the Impact? -- Individual Differences: Who Benefits From What? -- The Role of Cognitive Style for Learning With Animations -- The Role of Spatial Ability for Learning With Animations -- Conclusions: Can We Give Recommendations for the Design of Visual Representations? -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Figure 6. 3. A series of consecutive static pictures depicting the correct sequence of motions for high jumping. In this case, all 14 pictures have been merged into one picture. -- Figure 6. 1. A static picture explaining the Pythagorean theorem. -- Figure 6. 2. Exemplary states of the mitosis process. -- Figure 6. 4. Mirror neurons are activated when observing motions made by others. Similar brain areas are activated when actions are observed or actually executed. -- Figure 6. 5. Highly realistic and schematic pictures illustrating high jumping
  • Figure 6. 6. Series of simultaneously shown static pictures depicting motions of fish used in the study of Imhof et al. (2011)
Control code
EBC3315907
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (460 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781623962357
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC3315907
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL3315907
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10747031
  • (OCoLC)923178391

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