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The Resource "Cashville" - Dilution of Original Country Music Identity through Increasing Commercialization

"Cashville" - Dilution of Original Country Music Identity through Increasing Commercialization

Label
"Cashville" - Dilution of Original Country Music Identity through Increasing Commercialization
Title
"Cashville" - Dilution of Original Country Music Identity through Increasing Commercialization
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • Where I come from, it's cornbread and chicken. This line from Alan Jackson's country hit defines the genre as the music of the American South. All its ambiguity set aside, the South stands proudly for its hospitality, politeness, sense of place and community. Family and religion are traditionally more important down there than in the rest of the country. As Southern culture becomes more and more americanized and the music of the small town Southern man (another Jackson song) is adapted for a mainstream audience, the original rustic identity that defines the true American genre loses its charm. Modern country music has become slick and professionalized and sounds more and more like common pop music to make it more profitable. This study focuses on the authentic country music identity and how it is threatened by increasing commercialization. It defines said identity and the working class culture from which it springs. It traces the history of country music and its different genres from the 19th and early 20th century cowboy music over Western Swing and Honky-Tonk of the 1930s and 1940s, the progressive movements of the 1960s and 1970s up to today's mainstream Country Pop, and shows how its target audience has changed over time and how the opposition tries to preserve traditional sounds. Authentic Texas Country is set in contrast to the commercial Nashville recording industry and both are compared in their respective developments over the years. In the face of terrorism, which poses a threat to the American National identity, country music with its representative American values has become increasingly popular and enforces a strong collective identity on a national level. However, in doing so, it also dilutes the original identity that was once restricted to life in a small town community rather than the country as a whole. What sets country music
  • as a genre apart is its narrative structure. Every song has a story to tell: Be it about 'The Cold Hard Facts of Life', a prayer finally answered, or the first kiss on a Saturday night. Biographische Informationen Stephanie Schäfer was born in Braunschweig in 1984. After her graduation in 2004 and two years of law school, she received a BA degree in International Communication and Translation from the University of Hildesheim specializing in Business Translations of English and Spanish. Ever since her High School Year in 2001, the author has formed a special bond with the culture and history of the United States, and the state of Texas in particular. In accordance with that special interest she chose to write her BA-thesis about the impact of Mexican culture on U.S. border states. In the course of her MA degree program North American Studies at the Philipps University of Marburg, Stephanie Schäfer focused mainly on the academic field of cultural studies. At the end of her studies, she returned to Texas to do some in-field research for her work on the authentic Texas country music identity
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
LC call number
ML3524 -- .S334 2012eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Label
"Cashville" - Dilution of Original Country Music Identity through Increasing Commercialization
Link
http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/multco/detail.action?docID=1035426
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • "Cashville": Dilution of Original Country Music Identity through Increasing Commercialization -- Table of Contents -- I. Introduction: Country Music as Manifestation of Identity and Cultural Expression -- II. Stereotypes and Recognition of American Country Music -- III. Perspectives of Identity and Music: Social Identity Theory -- 1. Country Music Identity -- 2. Where I Come From: Southern Working Class Identity and Country Music -- 2.1 Peculiarities of Southern Culture: Sense of Place -- 2.2 Working-Class Culture -- IV. Generic Themes of Country Music -- V. History of Country Music: Blending of Cultures vs. Preservation of Identity -- 1. Cowboy Music -- 2. 1930s: Western Swing: Bob Wills -- 3. The 1940s and 1950s -- 3.1 Hillbilly/Honky-Tonk -- 3.2 The Bar: An Alternative Home -- 4. Reaching a Broader Audience: The Emergence of Radio Broadcasting -- 5. Early 1970s: Cosmic Cowboy/ Outlaw Movement -- 6. 1970s: Mainstream Country/Country-Pop -- 7. Late 1970s/1980s: Urban Cowboy -- 8. 1980s: New Traditionalists -- 9. 1990s - Today: Young Country -- VI. Musical Hybrids -- 1. Alternative Country -- 2. Country-Rock/Southern Rock/Americana -- 3. Blending of Cultures: Conjunto and Tejano Music -- VII. "Don't Get Above Your Raisin'": Authentic Regional Identity vs.Commercialization -- 1. Class Identity -- 2. Authenticity and Commodification -- 3. Back to the Roots: Country Identity and Regional Pride -- 3.1 Texas Country -- 3.2 Texas Regional Pride -- 3.3 Austin and Lubbock - Lone Star Country Music Arenas -- 3.4 Anti-Nashville Sentiments -- 4. Nashville Country -- 4.1 The (Countrypolitan) Nashville Sound -- 4.2 Commercialization and Performance -- 4.3 Grand Ol' Opry -- 4.4 Cowboy Lifestyle -- 4.5 Back to the Roots: The Story of Willie Nelson -- 4.6 "Gone Country": The Changing Face of Nashville -- VIII. Preliminary Conclusion
  • IX. Red, White, and Blue: National Expansion of Country Music -- 1. Country Music Goes to War -- 1.1 World War II -- 1.2 United Forces against Communism -- 2. Walls came tumbling down: Country Music after 9/11 -- 2.1 Unity in Crisis: National Identity -- 2.1.1 Toby Keith: "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)" -- 2.1.2 Alan Jackson: "Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)" -- 2.2 Country Songs in the Patriotic Tradition -- 2.2.1 Darryl Worley: "Have you Forgotten" -- 2.2.2 Brooks & Dunn: "Holy War" -- 3. Political Campaigns and Country Music -- 4. Country Musicians in Political Battle: Dixie Chicks vs. Toby Keith -- X. Conclusion -- XI. Bibliography -- Author's Profile
Control code
EBC1035426
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (120 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783842828452
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1035426
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1035426
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10596604
  • (OCoLC)815391710
Label
"Cashville" - Dilution of Original Country Music Identity through Increasing Commercialization
Link
http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/multco/detail.action?docID=1035426
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • "Cashville": Dilution of Original Country Music Identity through Increasing Commercialization -- Table of Contents -- I. Introduction: Country Music as Manifestation of Identity and Cultural Expression -- II. Stereotypes and Recognition of American Country Music -- III. Perspectives of Identity and Music: Social Identity Theory -- 1. Country Music Identity -- 2. Where I Come From: Southern Working Class Identity and Country Music -- 2.1 Peculiarities of Southern Culture: Sense of Place -- 2.2 Working-Class Culture -- IV. Generic Themes of Country Music -- V. History of Country Music: Blending of Cultures vs. Preservation of Identity -- 1. Cowboy Music -- 2. 1930s: Western Swing: Bob Wills -- 3. The 1940s and 1950s -- 3.1 Hillbilly/Honky-Tonk -- 3.2 The Bar: An Alternative Home -- 4. Reaching a Broader Audience: The Emergence of Radio Broadcasting -- 5. Early 1970s: Cosmic Cowboy/ Outlaw Movement -- 6. 1970s: Mainstream Country/Country-Pop -- 7. Late 1970s/1980s: Urban Cowboy -- 8. 1980s: New Traditionalists -- 9. 1990s - Today: Young Country -- VI. Musical Hybrids -- 1. Alternative Country -- 2. Country-Rock/Southern Rock/Americana -- 3. Blending of Cultures: Conjunto and Tejano Music -- VII. "Don't Get Above Your Raisin'": Authentic Regional Identity vs.Commercialization -- 1. Class Identity -- 2. Authenticity and Commodification -- 3. Back to the Roots: Country Identity and Regional Pride -- 3.1 Texas Country -- 3.2 Texas Regional Pride -- 3.3 Austin and Lubbock - Lone Star Country Music Arenas -- 3.4 Anti-Nashville Sentiments -- 4. Nashville Country -- 4.1 The (Countrypolitan) Nashville Sound -- 4.2 Commercialization and Performance -- 4.3 Grand Ol' Opry -- 4.4 Cowboy Lifestyle -- 4.5 Back to the Roots: The Story of Willie Nelson -- 4.6 "Gone Country": The Changing Face of Nashville -- VIII. Preliminary Conclusion
  • IX. Red, White, and Blue: National Expansion of Country Music -- 1. Country Music Goes to War -- 1.1 World War II -- 1.2 United Forces against Communism -- 2. Walls came tumbling down: Country Music after 9/11 -- 2.1 Unity in Crisis: National Identity -- 2.1.1 Toby Keith: "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)" -- 2.1.2 Alan Jackson: "Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)" -- 2.2 Country Songs in the Patriotic Tradition -- 2.2.1 Darryl Worley: "Have you Forgotten" -- 2.2.2 Brooks & Dunn: "Holy War" -- 3. Political Campaigns and Country Music -- 4. Country Musicians in Political Battle: Dixie Chicks vs. Toby Keith -- X. Conclusion -- XI. Bibliography -- Author's Profile
Control code
EBC1035426
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (120 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783842828452
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2017. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (MiAaPQ)EBC1035426
  • (Au-PeEL)EBL1035426
  • (CaPaEBR)ebr10596604
  • (OCoLC)815391710

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